Tags

, , ,

In preparation for a collaborative poetry post next month I thought I would share a great resource on this form from which Haiku is derived.

What’s cool about it is that the poem becomes a conversation around a theme. One poet writes Haiku, another a couplet, and so on, as Jane Reichhold explains below. Visit AhA Poetry’s website for more on Haiku, Tanka, Renga, and more.

back

basho

BARE BONES

School of Renga 

Jane Reichhold  

           
Edit
      Edit    
         

 

As result of my working with the Mendocino County teachers and the Poet Laureate Committee of Ukiah, California, I have seen that though my book, Writing and Enjoying Haiku, has been very helpful to many people, in this new work I am discovering that there needs be a better way to teach renga writing in schools.

So, as companion to the Bare Bones School of Haiku, I want to bring you the Bare Bones School of Renga with the hope that it will increase your pleasure and knowledge about renga.

Jane Reichhold
April, 2011

 

Lesson One
History of Renga

 

Lesson Two
How Renga were Done in Japan

 

Lesson Three
Basho as Renga Master

 

Lesson Four
First Steps for Learning to Renga

Doing tan renga, solo renga and book renga

Lesson Five
Writing Renga with a Partner

 

Lesson Six
Setting up a Renga

 

Lesson Seven
Linkage Techniques

 

Lesson Eight
Troubleshooting

 

Lesson Nine
Renga Variations – The Hyakuin

 

Lesson Ten
Renga Varitions – Net and Pyramid Renga

 

Lesson Eleven
Renga Variations – All the Rest

 

Lesson Twelve
Visual Renga

 

Resources

 

HOW TO USE THESE LESSONS

Read the lesson through to see if anything in it interests you or applies to your current interest in haiku.

Download the file into a word document and save all the files together in one directory.

Or

Print the lesson out on paper. You may print and give away as many copies as you wish as long as you do not sell them.

Use the printouts or the downloaded files as worksheets, writing down your poems, your ideas, and even what you feel about what is said.

Do save your files or worksheets. You may be surprised years later when you read again the lessons and your responses to find new ideas or understanding. It will be interesting to see how your haiku and your understanding of the form changes.

Blessed Be!

   
         
Edit
      Edit  
        Edit  

 Page and Materials Copyright © Jane Reichhold 2001.

Please give credit when borrowing. 

jr

Jane Reichhold has been combining her art and writing since her college days fifty years ago. Her latest book, by Kodansha International, is Basho The Complete Haiku. As founder and editor of AHA Books, Jane has also published Mirrors: International Haiku Forum, Geppo, for the Yuki Teikei Haiku Society, and she has co-edited with Werner Reichhold, Lynx for Linking Poets since 1992.. Lynxwent online in 2000 in AHApoetry.com, the web site Jane started in 1995. She lives near Gualala, California with Werner, her husband, and a Bengal cat named Buddha.

    The above picture of Basho at a renga party was painted by Buson and added to the text of Basho’s book Oku no Hosomichi – Narrow Road to the Far North. It was scanned from a facsimle scroll of the original work purchased at the Museum of Art in Tokyo, Japan.

 

 

 

   
         
           
      Edit  

Page and Materials Copyright © Jane Reichhold 2001

Advertisements